Living Planet Report | WWF

What would you like to search for?

LIVING PLANET REPORT 2020

BENDING THE CURVE OF BIODIVERSITY LOSS

WHAT IS THE LIVING PLANET REPORT?

The Living Planet Report 2020 is the 13th edition of WWF’s two-yearly flagship publication on the status of biodiversity on earth. 125 Experts from all over the world have contributed to the report. The Living Planet Index (LPI), provided by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), shows the average population trends of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish between 1970 and 2016. It currently measures the abundance of 4,392 species and 20,811 populations and is widely considered as a benchmark for the status of biodiversity.

READ THE LIVING PLANET REPORT 2020

DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT

QUICK FACTS FROM THE LIVING PLANET REPORT

DID YOU KNOW?

  • That the average abundance of monitored populations of freshwater species has declined by 84% on average since 1970, which is the equivalent to 4% per year.

  • Soil hosts one of the largest collections of biodiversity on Earth: up to 90% of living organisms spend part of their life cycle in soil habitats.

  • The number of documented plant extinctions is twice as many as for mammals, birds and amphibians combined.

  • 75% of the Earth’s ice-free land surface has already been significantly altered, most of the oceans are polluted, and more than 85% of the area of wetlands has been lost.

  • 87.6% of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil has lost its natural vegetation since the year 1500, mostly during the last century, which has led to at least two amphibian extinctions and 46 species threatened with extinction.

  • The African elephant has declined by 98.6% between 1985 and 2010 in the Central African Republic as a result of poaching for ivory and bushmeat.

  • In order to bend the curve any earlier than 2050 and minimize biodiversity losses, ambitious conservation needs to be combined with sustainable production and consumption measures, which means a deep transformation of our food system.

  • 60% of the world’s coffee varieties are in danger of extinction due to climate change, disease and deforestation.

  • 60% of emerging infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, come from animals, and nearly three-quarters of these from wild animals.

DOWNLOAD REPORT SUMMARY

LIVING PLANET REPORT IN THE NEWS

Read what's being said in the news about the Living Planet Report in the section below.

SINCE 1970, THERE HAS BEEN AN AVERAGE DECLINE OF 94% OF MANY SPECIES IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN. MUCH OF THIS DECLINE IS SEEN IN POPULATIONS OF REPTILES, AMPHIBIANS AND FISH.

Decline of Wildlife

Global wildlife populations have suffered an average two-thirds decline (68%) since 1970. In Latin America the situation is even worse, with an average reduction of 94%, due to human activities.

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

TAKE ACTION FOR THE PLANET

♦ Make sustainable choices - whether this be using less plastic, curbing your food waste or opting for eco-friendly and sustainably-sourced products, your choice can make an impact.

♦ Speak up as a consumer and as a citizen - use your voice to encourage businesses and governments to shift to more sustainable policies and practices.

♦ Spread the word - encourage your family and friends to join you as you show how much you care for our planet.

Together, we can be the generation that changes our relationship with the planet, for the better.

WHAT MORE CAN I DO?

WHAT IS WWF DOING?

OUR WORK

Our mission is to stop the degradation of our planet's natural environment, and build a future in which people live in harmony with nature. We want to ensure that the world’s most important fisheries and ocean ecosystems are productive and resilient and improve livelihoods and biodiversity; the most iconic and endangered species are secured and recovering in the wild; the integrity of our most important forests, including their benefits to human well-being, is enhanced and maintained; freshwater ecosystems and flow regimes provide water for people and nature; a global shift toward a low carbon and climate resilient future is achieved; and that sustainable food systems conserve nature and maintain food security.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

ALMOST ALL ASPECTS OF HUMAN HEALTH DEPEND ON A THRIVING NATURAL WORLD. BUT IF BIODIVERSITY LOSS CONTINUES AT THE CURRENT RATE, THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF MANY WILL ONLY GET WORSE.