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Map of the three Guianas
© WWF Guianas
The three Guianas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) border Brazil on the northern coast of South America. They are an exceptional part of the Amazon.
Due to their incredible low population densities, the Guianas -all of them with 80-90% pristine forest cover- are an exception to the majority of today's overpopulated world. Although much of their biodiversity is still unknown, it is for certain of an incredible richness. The coasts of the Guianas are home to one of the largest populations of the endangered Leatherback turtle in the world and hosts millions of migratory birds from North America which winter here. Typical Guiana birds such as the incredible Red Ibis and the Cock-of-the-Rock attract bird lovers from all over the world.
 
	© WWF Guianas
The Guianas have an incredible biodiversity
© WWF Guianas
Although the Guianas are still largely unexplored, it is certain they harbour an incredible biodiversity.
 
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The jaguar -Panthera onca- is one of the special protected species of the Guianas
© WWF Guianas
 
	© WWF Guianas
The three Guianas each contain at least 80% pristine forest cover
© WWF Guianas
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The Scarlet Ibis-Eudocimus ruber- is one of the well-known coastal birds of the Guianas
© WWF Guianas
 
	© WWF Guianas
The coasts of the Guianas are home to the critically endangered Leatherback-Dermochelys coriacea
© WWF Guianas
However; as ideal these pristine countries may seem, threats are also appearing fast.
The Guianas are not just rich in biodiversity, but also in natural resources, such as gold, bauxite and oil. Unsustainable extraction of especially the first threatens forests and freshwaters of the region on a large scale. The rapid expansion of small-scale gold mining in the Guianas, with increasing use of mercury is of immense concern to WWF.
© WWF Guianas © WWF Guianas